How will the demise of Vine affect college students and social media?

For four years, Vine has delighted many college students with its six-second loops. But the video app is being shuttered by parent company Twitter. Many are wondering if the next social media app to go will be Twitter, especially after the company also announced job cuts.

What do you think about the departing of Vine? (Credit: CNN Money)

What do you think about the departing of Vine? (Credit: CNN Money)

Let’s take a moment to mourn Vine and prepare for what lies ahead in the world of social media. Read more

Should I drop a class? Reasons and consequences

College students can be overwhelmed with a difficult, uninteresting or unnecessary class. Sometimes a course doesn’t teach the right material or the teacher is nasty. Then you begin to consider withdrawing from a class.

Decide now if you should drop a class. (Credit: FlockU)

Decide now if you should drop a class. (Credit: FlockU)

Luckily, under certain circumstances, you’re allowed to drop a class, but make sure you understand the consequences. Read more

More college students moving from community college to four-year college

If you think that attending a four-year college is the one and only way you can obtain a college degree, then we need to have a talk. According to a report issued by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center in 2015, more than 45 percent of college students have logged some time at a community college before concluding their four-year college degree.

More students are starting at community college and transferring to four-year colleges. (Credit: U.S. News)

More students are starting at community college and transferring to four-year colleges. (Credit: U.S. News)

Read on for tips on how to transfer and to determine if switching schools is the right choice for you. Read more

College athletes and compensation: Supreme Court to decide

Student athletes and college sports are a big part of college life. We love to watch them, and we cheer on our school’s team. But despite the popularity of college basketball, football and other sports, the athletes don’t get paid like the professional athletes do.

Should college athletes be compensated? (Credit: NPR.org)

Should college athletes be compensated? (Credit: NPR.org)

Ed O’Bannon, a former UCLA basketball player, brought the issue of unpaid college athletes to court, and the case has gone to the Supreme Court. Read more

Foreign affairs and geography facts: What do college students know?

Today’s world is more interconnected than ever, meaning that current events have much more of an impact on our day-to-day lives. A recent National Geographic survey, however, found that college students might need a bit of help in the areas of geography and foreign affairs.

How well do you know world geography? (Credit: The Telegraph)

How well do you know world geography? (Credit: The Telegraph)

I know it can seem like an impossible task to keep up with everything that is going on in the world, but read on for the things you need to know to improve your global literacy. Read more

New college rankings—How do we determine who is the best?

Everyone wants to be number one—institutions of higher education are not exempt from this. But figuring out who is the best can be a tricky proposition.

How much do college rankings matter? (Credit: American Observer)

How much do college rankings matter? (Credit: American Observer)

The latest college rankings have just been revealed, but what do they really say about which are the best colleges and what we value in education? Read more

How HB2 is affecting NCAA athletics in North Carolina

Fans of college athletics know how important college basketball is in the state of North Carolina. The recent news that the NCAA won’t play any basketball championships in 2017 because of the HB2 bill has upset more than the fans, especially after the ACC followed in their footsteps.

HB2 law has created issues for North Carolina in regards to college sports. (Credit: USA Today Sports)

HB2 law has created issues for North Carolina in regards to college sports. (Credit: USA Today Sports)

Both groups’ decisions will have major impacts on the state financially, but it is also a blow to fans of college sports in North Carolina. Read more

Disclaimer: Trigger warnings may (or may not) be unsuitable for college campuses

The topic of trigger warnings on college campuses have sparked a widespread debate across the country just recently. Seen as a trend more severe than political correctness, the college campus has become a safe zone, free of trigger warnings and microaggression.

Do you believe trigger warnings are good or bad for college campuses? (Credit: The Atlantic)

Do you believe trigger warnings are good or bad for college campuses? (Credit: The Atlantic)

College professors on some campuses are expected to warn students about potentially discomforting material. Continue reading to learn more about the value and the opposition of trigger warnings. Read more

Do college students have to serve jury duty?

It isn’t often that a person has jury duty on the same day as Taylor Swift. I certainly wasn’t on the Nashville, TN jury she sat on, but I did serve jury duty on August 26! It’s the first time I’ve actually made it to jury duty. I’ve been called three times as a college student in the state of Massachusetts, where I had to defer each time.

One of the photos tweeted of Taylor Swift at jury duty on August 26, 2016. (Credit: The Cut)

One of the photos tweeted of Taylor Swift at jury duty on August 26, 2016. (Credit: The Cut)

Most college students aren’t exempt from serving in either their home state and some are also eligible in the state where they attend college. What should you do if you get called? And what’s the process for jury selection? Here are things you need to know about jury duty (and a little bit of celebrity gossip to make it go down easy). Read more

Tips for college freshmen avoiding the “red zone”

It’s the beginning of September, and you’ve likely been on campus for a week (or three). The first six weeks of college can be a big adjustment, especially for college freshmen. I’d been a relatively sheltered teen from a small town in Iowa when I started college in Western Massachusetts on a campus with a far more liberal culture than I’d previously experienced, and with a much more diverse student body.

Schools are telling freshmen to not expect safe zones at college. (Credit: Heat Street)

Schools are telling freshmen to not expect safe zones at college.(Credit: Heat Street)

There are big discussions going on about how college students engage with new ideas and opinions that challenge their assumptions about the world: pundits debate the merit of “trigger warnings” and “safe spaces,” as in the letter the University of Chicago Dean of Students sent out to incoming freshmen recently. How can you best adjust to college life and avoid the dangers of the so called “red zone” of the first six weeks of school? Take a look at what’s being said and decide how you should react to it. Read more