Changing school demographics: More working college students enrolling

Not long ago, the typical college student was under age 25, single and without children. The college years meant dorm living, new freedoms and transitioning to life without the constant presence of parents. Getting a degree was possible in four years because students focused mainly on their coursework. Although many held part-time jobs and participated in social events, these took second place to getting a degree.

Changing school demographics show the typical student is more than likely to be over age 25, have a family and be a working college student. These nontraditional students looking at college enrollment, whose ranks include stay-at-home moms, military personnel, retirees and veterans, have different needs than the conventional college student, and their growing influence is changing how many colleges operate. Read more

Cost of college education and the rise in college tuition

The job market has always been competitive—now, even more so in this strained economy. When you begin your job search, you’ll need every edge possible to leap to the top of the resume pile, and a college degree might just be your ticket to rising above the competition. Even though times are tough for everyone, studies show that college grads consistently earn more than those without a degree. Read more

How can a PLN help educators stay connected?

As an educator, you spend your days in the classroom and your nights preparing lesson plans and grading papers. Occasionally, you attend a conference. What you really need, though, is some time to collaborate with other educators—to share your thoughts and ideas about education. You may not think you have any availability but, believe it or not, there are several new ways for you to connect with other educators and build your own PLN or personal learning network without putting in even more hours every week. Read more

Department of Education regulations: Gainful employment pros and cons

In February 2011, the House of Representatives approved an amendment that would stop Department of Education regulations known as “gainful employment.” These regulations attempt to clarify the definition of “gainful employment,” a concept first outlined in the Higher Education Act of 1965. In a paper by Mark Kantrowitz entitled “Student Aid Policy Analysis – What Is Gainful Employment?,” he writes,  “The Higher Education Act of 1965 requires for-profit colleges to provide ‘an eligible program of training to prepare students for gainful employment in a recognized occupation’ but does not currently define gainful employment.” Thus, the need for clarification! Read more

Women in higher education: Gender inequality in academia

Although women used to be in the minority on college campuses, you’re sure to have noticed that in most schools its just the opposite now. Despite the dramatic increase in the number of women enrolled in colleges and universities around the world, there is still gross gender inequality when it comes to professional advancement of women in higher education.

MIT survey results

In 1999, MIT released a report on the status of women faculty that quantified the problem of gender inequality in academia and indicated several areas for improvement. The report was updated in 2002, and again in March 2011: A Report on the Status of Women Faculty in the Schools of Science and Engineering at MIT, 2011. The latter of these survey results showed a promising increase in the number of women professors. Read more

Challenging William Cronon and academic freedom: The Wisconsin case

When University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of history, geography and environmental studies William Cronon kicked off his new blog on March 15, 2011, he never expected that his post would add fuel to the debate about academic freedom and corporate incursion in education. Read more

Does higher self-esteem lead to higher academic achievement?

Natalie Monroe, a Philadelphia high-school teacher, was recently disciplined when comments posted on her blog about her students came to light. Without using names, Monroe complained about her students’ laziness and lack of motivation. From the vitriol in her comments to the points she made, her postings have struck a chord and raised a question that we will pose as: “Does higher self-esteem lead to higher academic achievement?” Read more

College textbook rentals: Save hundreds of dollars through rental services

College tuition continues to climb and so do the costs of textbooks. No matter your degree program, you’ll be lucky to get away with spending only $400 on textbooks in one semester alone—unless you explore textbook rentals. Opting for a textbook rental service can save you upwards of 80 percent on college textbooks, and it also means you won’t have a bulky stash of books to get rid of come graduation. Read more