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College athletes and compensation: Supreme Court to decide

Student athletes and college sports are a big part of college life. We love to watch them, and we cheer on our school’s team. But despite the popularity of college basketball, football and other sports, the athletes don’t get paid like the professional athletes do.

Should college athletes be compensated? (Credit: NPR.org)

Should college athletes be compensated? (Credit: NPR.org)

Ed O’Bannon, a former UCLA basketball player, brought the issue of unpaid college athletes to court, and the case has gone to the Supreme Court. Read more

5 college tips for student athletes

Time management skills are difficult for all college students, never mind student athletes. It takes great determination and planning to address academic requirements and play sports. College athletes have hours of practice every day, training and exercising in the gym, meetings with the coach, and time away from schoolwork nights and weekends for games, many of which require lengthy travel to other cities and states.

Lives of student athletes are a tad different from their college peers. (Credit: LCA)

Lives of student athletes are a tad different from their college peers. (Credit: LCA)

Here are 5 college tips for on managing time so you can be both a successful athlete and college student: Read more

College sports and academics: Reading level of student athletes

Recent research has questioned how prepared college athletes are in higher ed academics.

Recent research has questioned how prepared college athletes are in higher ed academics.

The revelation by University of North Carolina (UNC) whistleblower Mary Willingham that some college athletes read at a grade school level has received much attention. Willingham was a learning specialist in the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes at UNC. After conducting research on the literacy levels of athletes, she discovered that of 183 athletes in revenue-generating sports admitted to UNC between 2004 and 2012, 8-10 percent were reading below a third-grade level, about 60 percent were reading between the fourth- and eighth-grade levels. She also discovered that a tutor had written a paper for a football player. UNC has disavowed her, discredited her research, refused to conduct further investigation and suspended her research. Willingham has also received death threats. Read more